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(Source: untiltedx)

Tags: dna poetry npr
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80 Teddy Ruxpins Speak Emotional Text from the Web

T, E. D. is an art installation that renders text from social media to voice, spoken through 80 Teddy Ruxpin dolls. Here’s more detailed info from the artist Sean Hathaway’s site, including a synopsis and explanation of the set up and programming. You have to see this video:

(Source: untiltedx, via travpol)

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digitextnet:

Dylan & kitten — it rhymes.

digitextnet:

Dylan & kitten — it rhymes.

(Source: effyeahbobdylan, via travpol)

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teachingliteracy:

Lost in a book (by Jellabeen)

teachingliteracy:

Lost in a book (by Jellabeen)

Tags: reading
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Human body as text.

Human body as text.

(Source: the-beauty-of-words-blog, via untiltedx)

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(via untiltedx)

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"I don’t like reading off a computer screen” — it’s a cliché of the e-book world. It means “I don’t read novels off of computer screens” (or phones, or PDAs, or dedicated e-book readers), and often as not the person who says it is someone who, in fact, spends every hour that Cthulhu sends reading off a computer screen. It’s like watching someone shovel Mars Bars into his gob while telling you how much he hates chocolate."

Opening paragraph of “You DO like reading off a computer screen” from Content: Selected Essays on Technology, Creativity, Copyright and the Future of the Future by Cory Doctorow

If I had written this essay, it would be my manifesto—or something like it. Still, I’ll adopt it as best I can. Read on to see if Doctorow convinces you.

(Source: untiltedx, via travpol)

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infoneer-pulse:

via Dilbert
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Little Printer will print mini newspapers the size of a receipt from rss feeds over wifi. This looks like a niche thing—hardly a necessity—but imagine the possibilities. Read your headlines and blog posts, see pictures, get reminders for your day without having to wake up a device first thing each morning. Authors could set up rss feeds with episodes set to update every morning, so you could read a piece of a novel, or maybe more practically, a poem each morning. You could send secret coded messages to friends, or pictures to your fans. This could potentially save paper, if the output is kept to a minimum. No need to print out a few tweets on a whole sheet of paper. And you could carry it with you throughout the day. Want to read more? Then look it up on your phone. You don’t need to surf your phone to find good content, just have Little Printer let you know where to find it. Don’t have a phone? Well, that’s too bad, since it’s powered with an app. Even more inconvenient, though, is it won’t be ready to ship till 2012! That means no Little Printers this Christmas. Maybe it’ll be ready in time for Valentine’s Day? Via Boing Boing

(Source: untiltedx, via travpol)

Tags: printing paper